GRI index

 
SASOL GRI TABLE - 1 Oct 2010
  GRI G3 Element   Reference (as per 2010 report)
STRATEGY AND PROFILE
1. Strategy and Analysis
1.1 CEO statement about the relevance of sustainability to the organisations and its strategy This is addressed in the chief executive’s statement
Additional perspective is provided in the interview with the Chairman
1.2 Description of key impacts, risks and opportunities The key impacts, risks and opportunities are identified throughout the report and in the supplementary material on the website.  View a formal review of our top 14 group risks. Further information on the principal group-wide risks is provided in Item 3D of our Form 20F, and in the AFS - Chief financial officer's review, for specific financial risks.
2. Organisational Profile
2.1 Name of the organisation Sasol.
2.2 Primary brands, products and/or services An overview of our principal products is available in our Annual Review with additional detail on our website: www.sasol.com > our markets
2.3 Operational structure of the organisation An overview of the operational structure is available in our Annual Review (AR - Our business) and on our website: www.sasol.com > explore Sasol > company profile > corporate structure. Further information on the principal group-wide risks is provided in Item 4 of our Form 20F.
2.4 Location of the organisation’s headquarters Johannesburg, South Africa.
2.5 Number of countries where the organisation operates See Our growth opportunities worldwide. Additional detail is provided on AR - Our business and AFS - Regions in which we invest.
2.6 Nature of ownership and legal form Directors Report and shareholders information, as well as share capital (note 45) (AFS - Shareholder's information)
2.7 Markets served See AR - Our business and www.sasol.com > our markets
2.8 Scale of the reporting organisation See AR - Our business and www.sasol.com > explore Sasol > company profile > corporate structure
2.9 Significant changes during the reporting period All acquisitions and dispositions are reported on in the AFS via the liquidity notes in terms of IFRS - IAS 7 (notes 55 and 56). In addition we list acquisitions and dispositions in the Directors Report in terms of the Companies Act, based on reporting materiality. Any changes to the quantitative reporting parameters are identified in the performance table and accompanying notes at the end of the sustainable development report.
2.10 Awards received in the reporting period See the case study - Recognised for our sustainable development reporting and performance for an account of recent sustainability-related awards.
3. Report Parameters
3.1 Reporting period 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2010.
3.2 Date of most recent previous report November 2009 – covering the 2009 financial year.
3.3 Reporting cycle Annual with internal quarterly performance reports issued on selected issues.
3.4 Contact point Key contacts listed on inside back cover of the sustainable development report.
3.5 Process for defining report content The report content has been informed, amongst other things, by: the expectations of our stakeholders; our internal risk management processes which has informed the identification of our most material issues; the requirements of the King III governance standard; and with consideration to the recommendations of the Global Reporting Initiative's G3 Guidelines. 
3.6 Boundary of the report The report covers all of our global operations over which we have operational control. In our online report we have also identified the main sustainability risks relating to our joint venture operations. See also Sasol’s integrated sustainable development reporting process.
3.7 Limitations Issues that are currently not being measured or reported on, or for which only partial or derived performance measures are available, are identified in relevant sections of this GRI table. Further detail on the reporting and measurement processes associated with some of our quantitatively reported parameters are provided in the footnotes accompanying our performance table. See also our Forward-looking statements.
3.8 Basis for reporting on JVs We have reported quantitatively on all the JVs over which we have operational control; in these instances we have reported the full performance data of the JV and not on a pro rate basis. For those JVs where we do not have operational control we have identified the major sustainability risks. See Sasol’s integrated sustainable development reporting process.
3.9 Data measurement techniques Our performance data – Notes on measurement
3.10 Explanation of effect of restatements Our performance data – Notes on measurement
3.11 Significant changes A general comment on the scope and boundary of the report is provided in the description of Sasol’s integrated sustainable development reporting process. All acquisitions and dispositions (affecting the boundary of the report) are reported on in the Annual Financial Statements (AFS, notes 55 and 56). In addition we list significant acquisitions and dispositions in the Directors Report in terms of the Companies Act, based on reporting materiality. Any changes in the measurements methods applied in the report are described in Our performance data – Notes on measurement.
3.12 GRI content index GRI index
3.13 Assurance View the assurance statement.
4. Governance, Commitments and Engagement
4.1 Governance structure Annual Financial Statements 2010 - Corporate governance. See also Item 6C of our Form 20F.
4.2 Nature of role of the Chair Annual Financial Statements 2010 - Composition of the board and appointment of directors.
See also Item 6C of our Form 20F.
4.3 No of non-executive members Annual Financial Statements 2010 - Composition of the board and appointment of directors.
See also Item 6C of our Form 20F.
4.4 Mechanisms for shareholder direction and employee input Annual Financial Statements 2010 - Corporate governance.
See also the commentary provided in the section Responding to our stakeholders.
4.5 Linkage between compensation and performance Remuneration report in Annual Financial Statements 2010. 
4.6 Processes for managing conflicts of interest All related party transactions are reported on (as defined by IFRS - IAS 24 and the SEC regulations). (AFS corporate and remuneration report on beneficial shareholding and note 59.
4.7 Process for determining expertise Governance section of the Annual Financial Statements 2010.
4.8 Internally developed statements of mission or values, codes of conduct relevant to economic, social and environmental performance Examples of relevant statements, codes of conduct, standards and procedures are referred to throughout the sustainable development report in the context of the respective issue being reviewed.
4.9 Risk management procedures CFO (for financial specific risks) and Governance report in Annual Financial Statements 2010.
4.10 Performance evaluation processes Some disclosure on evaluating board performance is provided in the remuneration report in the Annual Financial Statements 2010 (AFS governance report) and in Investing in our People.
4.11 Explanation of how precautionary approach/principle is addressed by organization The principles that underlie the precautionary approach inform many of our activities, particularly as regards our management of occupational safety and health, and our impacts on the environment. Our activities in implementing these principles are described throughout our sustainable development report. Specific examples are provided relating to our climate change management practices and biodiversity.
4.12 Externally developed economic, environmental and social charters, principles or other initiatives. A list of Sasol’s participation in external initiatives is provided in our review of Supporting global initiatives.
4.13 Membership in associations and/or advocacy organisations A detailed list of Sasol’s membership in associations is provided in the Sasol online report in the review of Our Sustainable Development Management Framework.
4.14 List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organisation An overview of Sasol’s approach to stakeholder engagement, including a list of our core stakeholder groups, is provided in the section Engaging with stakeholders
4.15 Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders An overview of Sasol’s approach to stakeholder engagement, as well as (where necessary) an explanation of the reason for engaging with them, is provided in the section Engaging with stakeholders
4.16 Approaches to stakeholder engagement An overview of Sasol’s approach to stakeholder engagement is provided in the section Engaging with stakeholders. The online report also includes additional information on the outcomes of our previous stakeholder engagement processes on sustainability issues.
4.17 Key topics and concerns that have been raised through stakeholder engagement A comprehensive account of the topics and concerns raised through our engagements with stakeholders over the past few years is available in this online report.
MANAGEMENT APPROACH AND PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
ECONOMIC – including policies, management systems, management approach and performance relating to the following indicators
Economic performance
DMA Disclosure on management approach Reference to organisation-wide goals, policy and performance relating to the traditionally “financial” elements of these economic performance indicators is provided in some detail in the Annual Financial Statements 2010. Reference to policies and performance relating to socially-minded procurement activities, human resource activities and to Sasol’s corporate social investment programme is provided in specific sections of the sustainable development report as indicated below.
EC1 Direct economic value generated and distributed, including revenues, operating costs, employee compensation, donations and other community investments, retained earnings, and payments to capital providers and governments. Summary of value-added information is provided in the section Contributing to socio-economic development. Full details are available in the value added statement in the Annual Financial Statements 2010.
EC2  Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization’s activities due to climate change. A detailed assessment of the risks and opportunities of climate change are provided in our 2009 Carbon Disclosure Project submission and at www.cdproject.net
EC3  Coverage of the organization’s defined benefit plan obligations. Details are provided in the Annual Financial Statements 2010 in terms of IFRS - IAS 19
(AFS Note 21). 
EC4 Significant financial assistance received from government. We do not receive any significant financial assistance from government. Refer to Annual Financial Statements 2010 where it is addressed in terms of IFRS - IAS 20 (see policy on deferred income).
Market Presence
EC5 Range of ratios of standard entry-level wage compared to local minimum wage at significant locations of operation. We do not provide a comprehensive range of ratios of entry-level wage compared to local minimum wages due to the administrative challenges in doing so as a result of the large number of different regions that we operate in globally. We are committed to providing competitive and fair wages and believe that we do so at all our operations
EC6  Policy, practices, and proportion of spending on locally-based suppliers at significant locations of operation. In terms of procurement practices, Sasol’s most material concerns relate to using procurement in our South African operations to stimulate black economic empowerment in the country. This tends necessarily to be of a local nature. Details on our BEE procurement figures is provided in the section Promoting empowerment in South Africa.
EC7 Procedures for local hiring and proportion of senior management hired from the local community at locations of significant operation. The majority of our operations are located in South Africa, where our BEE policies and procedures ensure that we employ locally – this includes hiring for senior management positions (see e.g. Enhancing workforce diversity). We are also committed to promoting “localisation” at our other global operations. Statistics on the ratio of local to expatriate labour is available for specific regions on request. 
Indirect economic impacts
EC8 Development and impact of infrastructure investments and services provided primarily for public benefit through commercial, in-kind or pro bono engagement. A general overview of Sasol’s indirect economic impacts is provided in our review Contributing to socio-economic development, as well as in the value added statement in our annual financial statements. Although some of Sasol’s projects and facilities entail the development of infrastructure, with important resulting public benefit, the company does not currently report specifically on this parameter. While we have been engaged in a number of projects relating specifically to addressing infrastructure concerns in some of our communities in partnership with local government authorities, these are currently not separately registered and reported on for the purposes of our sustainable development report. Any direct investments in infrastructure associated with our corporate social investment programme are provided in Sasol's separate corporate social investment (CSI) report. We undertake to provide a more specific review of the nature of these investments and services as part of our 2011 reporting processes.
EC9 Understanding and describing significant indirect economic impacts, including the extent of impacts. A overview of Sasol’s indirect economic impacts is provided in our review Contributing to socio-economic development
ENVIRONMENTAL – including policies, management systems, management approach and performance relating to the following indicators
DMA Disclosure on management approach Reference to organisation-wide goals, policy and performance relating to environmental performance is provided in Our sustainable development management framework. Additional contextual information relating performance is provided in relevant areas as indicated below.
Material use
EN1  Materials used by weight or volume. A quantitative account of Sasol’s total material use is provided in Our performance data tables.
EN2  Percentage of materials used that are recycled input materials. Sasol does not account separately for this. Due to the nature of the company’s business and primary feedstock, it is not seen to be practical (nor sufficiently material) to record and report such information. 
Energy use
EN3  Direct energy consumption by primary energy source. A quantitative and externally audited account of direct energy consumption is provided in Our performance data tables. Further details at a company-based level are available on request.
EN4  Indirect energy consumption by primary energy source. A quantitative and externally audited account of indirect energy consumption is provided in Our performance data tables. Further details at a company-based level are available on request.  
EN5  Energy saved due to conservation and efficiency improvements. The energy savings from particular conservation and efficiency projects are documented in the review of Sasol’s energy efficiency initiatives.  Further details are provided in our 2010 Carbon Disclosure Project submission.
EN6  Initiatives to provide energy-efficient or renewable energy based products and services, and reductions in energy requirements as a result of these initiatives. A review of our energy-related activities is provided in the climate change section of our online report.
EN7  Initiatives to reduce indirect energy consumption and reductions achieved. A review of our energy-related activities is provided in the climate change section of our online report.
Total water use
EN8  Total water withdrawal by source. A quantitative account of total water usage is provided in Our performance data tables. Further details at a company-based level are available at business unit level in our Integrated Annual Review. We do not currently provide a detailed breakdown of total water withdrawal by source throughout our many individual organisations globally, but this information is available on request. 
EN9  Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water. Sasol reports on this parameter at a high level. Our most significant water withdrawal is from the Vaal system supply in South Africa. Our demand represents about 4% of the total off-take from this system. We operate in terms of a very clear legal framework. Further details are provided in the section Addressing the challenge of water security (Promoting effective catchment management).
EN10  Percentage and total volume of water recycled and reused. Sasol monitors and reports internally at a facility-level on the volume of water that is recycled and reused. This information is available on request. 
Biodiversity
EN11  Location and size of land owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas. A quantitative account of general land usage is provided in our performance review on Managing land use and biodiversity and in Our performance data. For the purposes of this reporting parameter we have not undertaken a specific assessment of the nature of the "biodiversity value" of land that we own, lease, or manage, or that we are adjacent to. However, as outlined in our review of Our sustainable development management framework systems and standards are in place to manage the environmental impacts of our operations including specifically as regards biodiversity - and relevant sections of the online report). We will review the merit of reporting specifically on this indicator as part of the 2011 reporting process. 
EN12 Description of significant impacts of activities, products and services on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas. An overview of Sasol’s activities to promote biodiversity are provided in our performance review on Managing land use and biodiversity and in the identified case studies (Managing biodiversity in the Bazaruto Archipelago and Progressive expansion into Papua New Guinea). 
EN13 Habitats protected or restored. Sasol does not currently report specifically on this parameter. Information on the company’s habitat protection work with regards to its operations in Mozambique is provided in a case study. Biodiversity is monitored at our Sasolburg sites (see Sasolburg SH&E Brief).
EN14  Strategies, current actions, and future plans for managing impacts on biodiversity. A general review of Sasol’s activities on biodiversity is provided in our performance review on Managing land use and biodiversity and in the identified case studies (Managing biodiversity in the Bazaruto Archipelago and Progressive expansion into Papua New Guinea. We recognise that this is an areas where we could adopt a more structured and systematic approach.
EN15 Number of IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species with habitats in areas affected by operations, by level of extinction risk. Sasol does not currently report specifically on this parameter. Information on this parameter with regards to Sasol’s operations in Mozambique is provided in relevant public disclosure reports associated with the Natural Gas Project, available at http://w3.sasol.com/natural_gas.
MM1 Total amount of land owned, leased, and managed for production activities or extractive use  This data is reported in Our Performance Data table at a group-wide level.
MM2 The number/percentage of sites identified as requiring biodiversity management plans, and the number/percentage of sites with plans in place None of our facilities require specific biodiversity management plans. Our principal biodiversity challenges relate to our exploration activities where we follow rigorous EIA and related requirements as described in the case studies (Managing biodiversity in the Bazaruto Archipelago and Progressive expansion into Papua New Guinea).
Emissions effluents and waste
EN16  Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight. A quantitative, externally audited account of Sasol’s direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions is provided in Responding to the climate change challenge and in Our performance data tables. A benchmark of our GHG emissions is provided in Reducing our environmental footprint.
EN17 Other relevant indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight. See above commentary.  
EN18  Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reductions achieved. Commentary of Sasol’s initiatives to reduce direct and indirect emissions – and independent benchmarking of Sasol’s direct and indirect emissions with our peers – is provided in Responding to the climate change challenge.
EN19  Emissions of ozone depleting substances by weight. Quantitative and qualitative information on Sasol’s approach to phasing out ozone depleting substances has been reviewed in our previous sustainable development reports all of which are available on our website. We believe this to be sufficiently well managed and no longer a key material issue. 
EN20  NO, SO, and other significant air emissions by type and weight A quantitative and externally audited account of Sasol’s significant atmospheric emissions is provided in our performance review (Minimising our atmospheric pollutants) and in Our performance data tables). Additional data is at a company-based level is available on request.
EN21 Total water discharge by quality and destination. A quantitative account of Sasol’s water discharge is provided in our performance review Addressing the challenge of water security and in Our performance data tables. 
EN22  Total weight of waste by type and disposal method. Sasol reports partially on this indicator: Sasol’s total weight of hazardous and non-hazardous waste generated is provided in our performance review (Promoting waste minimisations and site remediation) and in Our performance data tables. We do not report on disposal methods and final destinations of all our waste. Although we know the majority of wastes by type and disposal method, we are not currently measuring with sufficient detail and accuracy throughout all of our global operations. This is an area that we are seeking to address. We undertake to provide a more detailed review of this information as part of our 2011 reporting process. 
EN23  Total number and volume of significant spills. Sasol includes the reporting of significant spills as part of our monitoring and reporting of significant fires, explosions and releases. A quantitative account of significant fires, explosions and releases is provided in Our performance data. The definition of significant fires, explosions and releases is provided in the Notes on measurement (Note 3). Further details on logistics incidents (including spills), as well as a case study on the development of a severity index for fires, explosions and releases. Additional information on significant spills at a business unit level are available on request.
EN24  Weight of transported, imported, exported, or treated waste deemed hazardous under the terms of the Basel Convention Annex I, II, III, and VIII, and percentage of transported waste shipped internationally. Sasol does not currently centrally monitor and report data on this issue, but we plan to do so. Our volumes of waste shipped internationally are very small (primarily from Natref to China). This is managed at a decentralised level in accordance with systems to ensure that all permits are appropriately applied. 
EN25  Identity, size, protected status, and biodiversity value of water bodies and related habitats significantly affected by the reporting organisation’s discharges of water and runoff. Sasol does not currently report specifically on this parameter. We are nevertheless confident that our globally-applied SHE standards of performance ensure that biodiversity issues are effectively addressed in all sensitive areas. Measures are in place to ensure that we discharge as required by law and that we comply with all legal reporting requirements.
Products and services
EN26  Initiatives to mitigate environmental impacts of products and services, and extent of impact mitigation. An overview of Sasol’s activities undertaken as part of its commitment to product stewardship is provided in our performance review (Product stewardship: Managing the impacts of our products) and in the associated identified case study Capacity building on product stewardship in South Africa.
EN27 Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials that are reclaimed by category. Sasol does not report on this parameter at a quantitative level. Due to the nature of the company’s core business and its primary product type, Sasol does not deem this a sufficiently material issue.  
Compliance
EN28  Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations. A review of the relevant legal actions in which Sasol is engaged, including information on the monetary value of significant fines, is provided in our account of Fines, penalties and settlements and in our Form 20F submission (Item 4B - Business overview - Legal proceedings and other contingencies, as well as in note 57.4 Litigation of AFS).
Transport 
EN29 Significant environmental impacts of transporting products and other goods and materials used for the organisation’s operations, and transporting members of the workforce. Sasol reports publicly on the number of significant logistic incidents, and provides an account of measures being taken to reduce these incidents – see our response to the safety challenge Embedding a culture of safety.
Overall
EN30 Total environmental protection expenditures and investments by type. Various figures relating to environmental expenditure are reported on in the Annual Financial Statements 2010 (AFS: note 20 (long term provisions) and note 4 (assets under construction)). These include details on what has been released from the provision as well as spend on projects (assets under construction) relating to environmental initiatives. It is important to note however that it is often difficult to quantify expenditure that relates specifically to environmental protection (particularly when this forms part of other project requirements). 
SOCIAL – including policies, management systems, management approach and performance relating to the following indicators
Labour practices and decent work
DMA Disclosure on management approach Reference to organisation-wide goals, policy and performance relating to labour practices is provided in the review on Our human resources strategy. Additional contextual information relating to performance is provided in relevant areas as indicated below.
LA1  Total workforce by employment type, employment contract and region. Data on the total workforce numbers at a group level – broken down into permanent and non-permanent employees – is provided in our review of Investing in our people. Data on employee numbers by region (also broken down into permanent and non-permanent employees) is reported in Total workforce by employment type and region. We do not currently report on the number of part-time employees as there are very few such employees and we do not believe this to be a material issue in our business. Such data is available on request. 
LA2 Total number and rate of employee turnover by age group, gender and region. Employee turnover levels are reported at a general group in Our human resources strategy.  More detailed information by age and gender is available in the Total workforce by employment type and region.
LA3 Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees, by major operations. Sasol does not currently report specifically on this parameter, as we operate in multiple countries with different requirements. We do not believe that is sufficiently material to provide information on this issue at this level of detail.
LA4 Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining agreements. Details on Sasol’s labour relations activities, as well as the percentage of employees who are members of trade unions, is provided in the section Fostering a positive climate of employee relations
LA5 Minimum notice period(s) regarding operational changes, including whether it is specified in collective agreements. As outlined in the section Fostering a positive climate of employee relations, we have systems in place aimed at ensuring effective dialogue and relations with all employee representative groups throughout our operations globally. Specific provision for consultation relating to operational changes is provided in the collective agreements / works council agreements that have been entered into with trade unions in the various jurisdictions in which we operate. We do not currently report on the minimum notice period/s throughout all our global operations and will be assessing this issue as part of our 2011 reporting process.
MM4 Number of strikes and lockouts exceeding one week’s duration, by country We have included details on the total number of employee-days lost due to industrial action, and have been reporting on this for the past few years, providing a meaningful and consistent indicator of performance. These details are included in our review on Fostering a positive climate of employee relations.  
LA6 Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint management–worker health and safety committees that help monitor and advise on occupational health and safety programmes. Joint forums between trade unions and management are held to encourage constructive dialogue. These forums discuss issues such as wages, conditions of employment, health and safety, training and development, community care and HIV/Aids. These details are included in our review on Fostering a positive climate of employee relations.  
LA7 Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities by region. Details on Sasol’s occupational health and safety performance and the measures being taken to improve the company’s performance is provided in our review Embedding a culture of safety; View the safety performance data and our performance data. View a benchmark of our safety performance.
LA8 Education, training, counselling, prevention, and risk-control programmes in place to assist workforce members their families, or community members regarding serious diseases. Information on Sasol’s wellness programme (including HIV/Aids and occupational health) is provided in our review Promoting the wellbeing of our employees. This includes general information on Sasol’s employee assistance programme, which covers counselling relating to diseases.
LA9 Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unions. Regular consultation and engagement is undertaken with unions on health and safety issues. See Fostering a positive climate of employee relations. In particular, our strategy to reduce logistics incidents has been discussed in workshops with trade unions and is detailed in relevant sections of our online report.
LA10 Average hours of training per year per employee by employee category Sasol does not, in general, measure the effectiveness and investment of its learning, retraining and development activities by monitoring the number of training hours per employee, choosing instead to monitor training, learning and development through measures such as training costs as a percentage of total payroll and training costs per employee. Details on the numbers of employees receiving specific forms of training programme are reported in our account on Contributing to skills development.  
LA11  Programmes for skills management and lifelong learning that support the continued employability of employees and assist them in managing career endings. Sasol’s programmes for skills management and development are reviewed in the section on Contributing to skills development.
LA12  Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews. From mid-2009, all employees are to receive regular performance and career development reviews. This is reported in the review on Ensuring competitive compensation for our employees.
LA13 Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity. A review of Sasol’s employment equity performance and our initiatives on this issue is provided in our review on Enhancing workforce diversity. The composition of governance bodies is reviewed in more detail in the corporate governance report of the annual financial statement.
LA14 Ratio of basic salary of men to women by employee category. Sasol's Human Resources management principles are based on equal opportunity and non-discrimination.  As a signatory to the UNGC, Sasol upholds the core principles contained in the 1998 Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work, including (in this context) the principle relating to non-discrimination on the basis of gender. All remuneration is based on pre-defined role descriptions, and  does not take into account gender, race or age. For this reason we do not believe that there is necessary cause to report on this issue on a detailed quantitative level. We will review and report on this decision as part of our 2011 reporting process.
Human Rights
DMA Disclosure on management approach Reference at a broad level to organisation-wide goals, policy and performance relating to human rights is provided in our review on Respecting human rights. Additional contextual information relating to performance is provided in relevant areas as indicated below. 
HR1  Percentage and total number of significant investment agreements that include human rights clauses or that have undergone human rights screening. Sasol’s internal due diligence process requires that country risk assessments are performed before entering any given country. These assessments include screening for potential human rights non-compliance or violations. All significant investment agreements in new countries go through this country risk assessment and screening process. The extent to which human rights issues has a material bearing on the investment decision will vary according to the nature of the particular investment and the specific country risks. A general review of our human rights approach is provided in our review on Respecting human rights.
HR2  Percentage of significant suppliers and contractors that have undergone screening on human rights and actions taken. This is reported in terms of Sasol’s general policy relating to human rights issues, and not on a quantitative basis. We believe that through the implementation of our Supplier Engagement Plan, the general policy relating to human rights and information relating to the Ethics Hotline is adequately communicated to all suppliers.  All violations that are reported via the Ethics Line are recorded and resolved. As noted in our review on Respecting human rights we have included a specific focus this year on engaging our suppliers and service providers on Sasol’s code of ethics. As outlined in our review on Fostering ethical and fair business practice, changes have been made to our contracts to include ethics and code of conduct as a key requirement for doing business with Sasol and, where required, to encourage suppliers to implement their own code of conduct. We recognise that there is scope for more streamlined systems for monitoring and reporting quantitative data in this area generally. We will review and report on this issue as part of our 2011 reporting process.
HR3 Total hours of employee training on policies and procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained. All employees are provided with ethics awareness, which includes general awareness on human rights issues. This training is provided by ethics officers, whose profile has been boosted this year as part of a renewed focus in response to recent concerns relating to anti-competitiveness behaviour. Training is also integrated into values based leadership programmes and human resources policies. Further details are provided in the review on Respecting human rights
HR4 Total number of incidents of discrimination and actions taken. Our approach to managing these issues is outlined in our review on Fostering ethical and fair business practice with supplementary information provided in the relevant section of our online report. Any incidents of discrimination (as well as other ethical and human rights related concerns) are reported as part of our ethics line management process.  Incidents are dealt with in accordance with the Group’s disciplinary procedures and where proven, appropriate disciplinary action is taken which includes dismissal. Specific breaches of our Code of Ethics are not yet sufficiently detailed to enable a breakdown for reporting purposes. We are currently reviewing the feasibility of introducing an ethics management system to improve the monitoring, reporting and analysis of trends arising from calls to the ethics line, and to streamline ensuing investigations and follow-up activities. We will review and report on this issue as part of our 2011 reporting process.
HR5 Operations identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at significant risk, and actions taken to support these rights. No such operations have been identified within Sasol. Sasol’s human resources and labour policies support and respect the rights of workers as enshrined within the South African Bill of Rights. These are also in line with international standards. Sasol become a signatory to the UNGC in 2001 and in doing so, Sasol has committed to uphold all rights in relation to labour as embedded within UNGC principles that incorporate the ILO provisions. These issues inform our political risk analysis processes. 
HR6 Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labour, and measures taken to contribute to the elimination of child labour. As outlined in our review on Respecting human rights. Sasol’s policies are compatible with international human rights standards and with the South African Constitution. Sasol does not make use of child labour. Through the implementation of our supplier engagement plan, we review the practices of suppliers and contractors. We also conduct due diligence investigations in respect of prospective transactions, contracting parties and business partners. We have not detected such significant risks.
HR7 Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labour, and measures to contribute to the elimination of forced or compulsory labour. Sasol’s own operations do not pose such risk. Sasol’s policies are compatible with international human rights standards and with the South African Constitution. Through the implementation of our supplier engagement plan we review the practices of suppliers and contractors. We also conduct due diligence investigations in respect of prospective transactions, contracting parties and business partners. We have not detected such significant risks. See further our review on Respecting human rights.
HR8 Percentage of security personnel trained in the organization’s policies or procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations. All security personnel receive training in Sasol's Code of Ethics, which includes aspects of human rights. While there is thus full coverage in terms of this training, we recognise (as outlined in our review on Respecting human rights); that there is scope for more detailed human rights awareness and training programmes that are specifically tailored to affected staff members and service providers involved in activities and/or regions where there are particular human rights risks. Our commitment to human rights involves an increased focus on addressing this issue; we will report on our progress in doing so as part of the 2011 reporting process.
HR9 Total number of incidents of violations involving rights of indigenous people and actions taken. Using the understanding of Indigenous Peoples as formulated for example by the International Labour Organization, there have been no such incidents within Sasol.  In terms of managing relationships with local communities, should there be any violations of the rights of members of these local communities there are mechanisms in places for their detection, internal reporting and resolutions, including through the use of an externally managed ethics line and its associated investigation processes. This is outlined in more detail in our review on Fostering ethical and fair business practice. A recent activity that has involved particular interaction with local communities is the laying of the natural gas pipeline from Mozambique. An externally reviewed account of the nature of these interactions is provided in the Resettlement Planning and Implementation Programme available at http://w3.sasol.com/natural_gas. As outlined in our review on Respecting human rights our commitment to human rights includes an increased focus on developing appropriate monitoring and assurance mechanisms. We will report on our progress in doing so as part of the 2011 reporting process.
MM5 Total number of operations taking place in or adjacent to Indigenous Peoples’ territories, and number and percentage of operations or sites where there are formal agreements with Indigenous Peoples’ communities. Using the understanding of Indigenous Peoples as formulated for example by the International Labour Organization, there are currently no such operations within Sasol. 
Society
DMA Disclosure on management approach Reference at to the organisation-wide goals, policy and performance relating to most of the GRI indicators referred to below is provided in our review on Ethics, governance and human rights. Additional contextual information relating to performance is provided in relevant areas as indicated below. 
SO1 Nature, scope, and effectiveness of any programmes and practices that assess and manage the impacts of operations on communities, including entering, operating and exiting. Our approach to assessing and managing the impacts of operations on communities is demonstrated in particular by the activities that we have taken in our operations in Mozambique and Papua New Guinea. A detailed account of Sasol’s policies and practices on this issue, and of the effectiveness in implementing these polices and practices, is provided in the independent audited reports relating to the Mozambique Natural Gas Project available at http://w3.sasol.com/natural_gas. An account of our more recent experience in Papua New Guinea, which demonstrates the same approach, is available in our online report (http://sasolsdr.com).
MM6a Number and description of significant disputes relating to land use, customary rights of local communities and indigenous peoples. This is reported only in terms of Sasol’s general policy relating to human rights issues. We do not currently report quantitatively on this issue. Should there be any violations of this nature there are mechanisms in places for their detection, internal reporting and resolutions, including through the use of an externally managed Ethics line and its associated investigation processes. A recent activity that has involved particular interaction with local communities is the laying of the natural gas pipeline from Mozambique. An externally reviewed account of the nature of these interactions is provided in the Resettlement Planning and Implementation Programme available at http://w3.sasol.com/natural_gas. See also the case study regarding that nature of our activities in Papua New Guinea in the relevant section of our online repor. As outlined in our review on Respecting human rights our commitment to human rights includes an increased focus on developing appropriate monitoring and assurance mechanisms. We will report on our progress in doing so as part of the 2011 reporting process.
MM6b The extent to which grievance mechanisms were used to resolve disputes relating to land use, customary rights of local communities and indigenous peoples, and the outcomes. An externally reviewed account of the nature of these interactions is provided in the Resettlement Planning and Implementation Programme available at http://w3.sasol.com/natural_gas
SO2 Percentage and total number of business units analyzed for risks related to corruption. As outlined in our review on Fostering ethical and fair business practice, risk-based legal compliance processes, controls and systems are applied consistently in all Sasol businesses and enterprise functions, with the aim of providing reasonable assurance that all our business units comply with applicable laws and that the risk of non-compliance (including on issues relating to corruption) is minimised in an effective and efficient manner across the group.
SO3 Percentage of employees trained in organization’s anti-corruption policies and procedures. This issue is addressed in our review on Fostering ethical and fair business practice.
SO4 Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption. This issue is addressed in the context of Sasol’s ethics, human resources and forensic processes, and is outlined in section on Fostering ethical and fair business practice.  All cases are reported via the ethics line, and are managed through defined disciplinary and forensic investigation processes. They are reported on a quarterly basis to governance committees, and to the audit committee on an annual basis. Actions taken in consequence of investigations and enquiries include termination of employment in respect of employees, and cancellation of contracts in the case of suppliers and contractors. Quantitative analysis of trends is currently undertaken manually. We are currently investigating the introduction of an improved information management system. 
SO5 Public policy positions and participation in public policy development and lobbying. We briefly outline the nature of our key policy engagements on various items of legislation in relevant sections of the report, with supporting information in relevant sections of the online report, such as the sections on water and waste (http://sasolsdr.com). We do not provide a detailed account of our various policy positions as these are very detailed, particular to each circumstance, and are often having to adapt to reflect changing positions from government and other parties.
SO6 Total value of financial and in-kind contributions to political parties, politicians, and related institutions by country. Contributions or donations to political parties and related institutions is strictly prohibited.
SO7   Total number of legal actions for anticompetitive behaviour, anti-trust, and monopoly practices and their outcomes. This is addressed in our response to the challenge on Fostering ethical and fair business practice, and in our account of Fines, penalties and settlements and in our Form 20-F submission (Item 4B, Business overview, Legal proceedings and other contingencies, as well as in note 57.4 Litigation of AFS).
SO8 Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and regulations. A general review of the relevant legal actions in which Sasol is engaged, including information on the number and monetary value of significant fines, is provided in our account of Fines, penalties and settlements and in our Form 20-F submission (Item 4B, Business overview, Legal proceedings and other contingencies, as well as in note 57.4 Litigation of AFS).
MM7 Number (and percentage) of company operating sites with artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) taking place on, or adjacent to, the site; describe the associated risks and the actions taken to manage and mitigate these risks. There are currently no such operations within Sasol.
MM8 List sites where resettlements took place, the number of households resettled in each, and how their livelihoods were affected in the process. There were no resettlements during this reporting period that were required as a direct result of our activities. Previously there have been some resettlements associated with the laying of the natural gas pipeline from Mozambique to South Africa. An externally reviewed account of the nature of these interactions is provided in the Resettlement Planning and Implementation Programme available at http://w3.sasol.com/natural_gas
MM9 Number and percentage of operations with closure plans. All the operational Sasol Mining operations have approved Environmental Management Programmes (EMPs) and part of EMPs addresses closure and decommissioning of the operations.  This includes objectives and closure costs.
Sigma Colliery is the only mine, where Sasol Mining have in terms of Section 43(3) of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 (MPRDA) applied for a closure certificate within 180 days after a mining right has lapsed, been abandoned or cancelled.
MM10 Significant incidents involving communities in which grievance mechanisms have been invoked to address them, together with their outcomes. Our larger operations across the business all have formal mechanisms in place for identifying and responding to community grievances. These grievances and responses to them are recorded. We believe that during the year all material complaints have been suitably resolved. 
MM11 Number and description of incidents affecting employees, communities, or the environment in which emergency preparedness procedures were activated. Fully equipped emergency response centres are located at the Sasol Secunda and Sasolburg manufacturing sites. These centres are equipped to respond to any emergency including fires, gas releases, environmental spillages and external emergencies for which mutual aid agreements are in place. The emergency plans are practised and tested regularly.
There were 128 instances in Secunda and 70 instances in Sasolburg when emergency procedures were activated for internal fires, releases and spillages. None of these cases required the application of procedures to handle emergencies external to the factory site. In terms of product stewardship a centralized Sasol emergency response process and call centre is in place, capable of responding to product transportation emergencies and of advising both local and international emergency services. During 2010 there were 37 significant transportation incidents which called for emergency response. 
Product Responsibility
DMA Disclosure on management approach A brief review of the organisation-wide goals, policy and performance relating to our activities on product responsibility is provided in our account on Product stewardship: managing the impacts of our product. Additional contextual information relating to performance is provided in relevant areas as indicated below. 
PR1 Life cycle stages in which health and safety impacts of products and services are assessed for improvement, and percentage of significant products and services categories subject to such procedures. Sasol’s general approach to product stewardship is reviewed in our account on Product stewardship: managing the impacts of our products. Including case studies on Capacity building on product stewardship in South Africa; The new Sasol centre to drive fuels research; Pioneering alternative jet fuel technology; and Our life cycle assessments (LCA) of liquid transportation fuels.
PR2 Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning health and safety impacts of products and services during their life cycle, by type of outcomes. A general review of the relevant legal actions in which Sasol is engaged, including information on the number and monetary value of significant fines, is provided in our account of Fines, penalties and settlements and in our Form 20-F submission (Item 4B - Business overview - Legal proceedings and other contingencies, as well as in note 57.4 Litigation of AFS).
PR3 Type of product and service information required by procedures, and percentage of significant products and services subject to such information requirements. Sasol’s general approach to product stewardship is reviewed in our account on Product stewardship: managing the impacts of our products.
PR4 Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning product and service information and labelling, by type of outcomes. A general review of the relevant legal actions in which Sasol is engaged, including information on the number and monetary value of significant fines, is provided in our account of Fines, penalties and settlements and in our Form 20-F submission (Item 4B - Business overview - Legal proceedings and other contingencies, as well as in note 57.4 Litigation of AFS).
PR5 Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction. This parameter is not regarded as material to Sasol as Sasol does not sell to the general consumer market, but rather to select industrial customers who we engage with. 
PR6 Programmes for adherence to laws, standards, and voluntary codes related to marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship. This parameter is not regarded as material to Sasol as Sasol does not sell to the general consumer market, but rather to select industrial customers who we engage with. 
PR7 Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning marketing communications, including advertising, promotion and sponsorship by type of outcomes A general review of the relevant legal actions in which Sasol is engaged, including information on the number and monetary value of significant fines, is provided in our account of Fines, penalties and settlements and in our Form 20-F submission (Item 4B - Business overview - Legal proceedings and other contingencies, as well as in note 57.4 Litigation of AFS).
PR8  Total number of substantiated complaints regarding breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer data. This parameter is not regarded as material to Sasol as Sasol does not sell to the general consumer market, but rather to select industrial customers who we engage with.
PR9  Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services. A general review of the relevant legal actions in which Sasol is engaged, including information on the number and monetary value of significant fines, is provided in our account of Fines, penalties and settlements and in our Form 20-F submission (Item 4B - Business overview - Legal proceedings and other contingencies, as well as in note 57.4 Litigation of AFS).
MM12 Programmes and progress relating to materials stewardship Sasol’s general approach to product stewardship is reviewed in our account on Product stewardship: managing the impacts of our products.
 
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            GRI Core Indicator – as listed in GRI G3 guidelines
  GRI Additional Indicator – as listed in GRI G3 guidelines
  Mining and Metals supplement – core indicator (mainly applicable to Sasol mining, but also e.g. MNP)